Books

Vulcan 607 - Rowland White

It was to be one of the most ambitious operations since 617 Squadron bounced their revolutionary bombs into the dams of the Ruhr Valley in 1943…When Argentine forces invaded the Falklands in the early hours of 2 April 1982, Britain’s military chiefs were faced with a real-life Mission Impossible. Its opening shot, they decided, would be Operation Black Buck: to strike a body blow at the occupying army, and make them realize that nothing was safe – not even Buenos Aires…The idea was simple: to destroy the vital landing strip at Port Stanley. The reality was more complicated. The only aircraft that could possibly do the job was three months from being scrapped, and the distance it had to travel was four thousand miles beyond its maximum range. It would take fifteen Victor tankers and seventeen separate in-flight refuellings to get one Avro Vulcan B2 over the target, and give its crew any chance of coming back alive. 

Victor Boys - Tony Blackman

The Handley Page Victor was the third of the three V Bombers and the most long lasting, serving in the RAF until 1993, and still doing invaluable service in the first Iraq war. Moreover, in 1982 it was only the Victor tanker fleet based on Ascension Island that made possible the Vulcan Black Buck bombing of Port Stanley airfield and the long-range reconnaissance of Argentina by Nimrods. “Victor Boys” tells the story of all the great things that were achieved, recounted first hand by the operators themselves, aircrew and ground crew.

Tornado Down - John Nichol

RAF Flight Lieutenants John Peters and John Nichol were shot down over enemy territory on their first mission of the Gulf War. Their capture in the desert, half a mile from their blazing Tornado bomber, began a nightmare seven-week ordeal of torture and interrogation which brought both men close to death.

In Tornado Down, John Peters and John Nichol tell the incredible story of their part in the war against Saddam Hussien’s regime. It is a brave and shocking and totally honest story: a story about war and its effects on the hearts and minds of men.

Horizons - The History of the Air Cadets

Although the first air cadet unit was raised in Bournmouth in 1928, the first squadrons to be formed in a privately funded national organisation were part of the Air Defence Cadet Corps in 1938. Thousands of youngsters joined and were able to learn about aircraft, aerodynamics, navigation, mechanics and other subjects not taught in schools. The organization was to become known as The Air Training Corps (ATC) and as war loomed it was considered a useful RAF recruitment tool to attract potential airmen and ground crew. Throughout the war ATC cadets supported the home defences by fire watching, as messengers and as observers, working alongside the Home Guard, the fire services and other vital organisations. During the second half of the 1900s the corps continued to thrive.